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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
inside, 84-year-old ursula nixon. these are just bystanders who happen to see the crash happen, and they dove literally into action. >> there are also two police officers. >> pay close attention to this woman right here. that's katy nelson. she was eating lunch nearby. she jumped into the water and got inside the back window while these other good samaritans are holding her legs. she gets inside the back window. the 84-year-old woman says, i do not want to die in the back of this car. she says, you're not going to, and pulls her out of the car. watch as the woman in aqua comes out this back window. that's ursula nixon. they get her out just as the car sinks beneath the surface of the water. >> oh, my goodness. this whole time the car is just slowly sinking. you see it sinking and sinking and sinking. you just don't know what's going to happen. >> wcsh spoke to kay nelson about this incident. >> i saw that car sinking and saw the window. i'm like, she's too scared to move. i just jumped in and swam. >> they're risking their own lives jumping in here. they could have easily gotte
se vio confiado y el presidente nixon aparentaba lo contrario. >>> el presidente nixon se ponÍa nervioso empezaba a sudar. >>> fÁcilmente en una noche los debates pueden influir la decisiÓn de los electores. >>> un candidatos no estÁ preparado puede perder la elecciÓn. >>> en denver veremos un obama confiado, de la misma forma que saliÓ a debatir contra el senador mccain. romney no estarÁ en la misma situaciÓn en denver. >>> es una oportunidad de vida o muerte en terminos polÍticos para el candidato romney, no puede desperdiciar la oportunidad. >>> el gobernador romney es bueno debatiendo, yo simplemente soy bueno dijo. >>> es una manera de moverle el piso. >>> el equipo de preparaciÓn de debates de obama estudia debates de romney para preparar al presidentes, mientras los asesor {clearÑ] de romney aseguran que la Última semana se ha preparado para el encuentro. >>> aumentando la presiÓn de los candidatos ademÁs de la gran audiencia de televisiÓn millones de personas seguirÁn el debate paso a paso en facebook. >>> el miÉrcoles podrÁ ver el debate por telemundo a
vieron el debate de kennedy y nixon, la imagen fresca de kennedy superó a nixon después del encuentro las encuestas pusieron a kennedy 4 puntos sobre su rival ♪. >>> el gobierno de los estados unidos comenzó un nuevo programa piloto de deportación aérae, el plan es realizar dos vuelos desde el paso texas a ciudad de méxico, estas no son deportaciones voluntarias. >>> por tercera vez los asientos de un avión american airlines se sueltan en pleno vuelo, la empresa ha dicho que personal técnico examina las causas posibles. >>> se demandó a jp morgan chase por presunto fraude, de ben sterns la cual compró jp morgan a un precio muy bajo en el momento de la crisis >>> los expertos calculan que el primer debate presidencial entre los candidatos el presidente barack obama y mitt romney podría ser el más visto de la historia, luis megid en denver nos dice qué significado tiene ese estado para las campañas. >>> tradicionalmente un bastión republicano y el éxodo del campo a las ciudades, ha hecho colorado un lugar que todo es posible, hace 4 años colorado votó por le presidente bar
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
approval. remember nixon was criticized going to cambodia. everyone blasted him and blasted bush. at least saddam hussein had a trial. where are the liberals speaking out on that? >> eric: last thought, is president obama succeeding or failing in foreign policy? >> bob: succeeding. >> eric: that's what i thought. latest on libya, was it coverup or incompetence? is the president leading from the talk show couch? >> the annual u.n. media where rogue nations are calling for a new world order. obama snub key allies and skipped meetings with world leaders so he could be on tv. >> we brought cloth napkins as well. i want to be eye candy here. >> eric: new ad calls out obama for gabbing with the gals of "the view" instead of the intel people. dana is on deck next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> dana: new ad by the super pac american crossroad look at obama's foreign affairs and preoccupation being on popular television shows. >> what did president obama do the same day of a terror attack on american citizens? he campaigned in las vegas. then at the annual u.n. meeting where rogue nations are calling
joven senador john kennedy, con richard nixon, incÓmodo y sudado. >>> la gente que vio el debate por televisiÓn, penso que lo habÍa ganado kennedy la gente que lo escuchÓ por radio. pensÓ que lo habÍa ganado nixon. >>> claro, kennedy era una figura mÁs atractiva. >>> los suspiros de un impaciente al gore, frente a george frente a george w bush causaron su derrota en los debates y puntos de elecciÓn ronald reagan, dijo que no explotarÍa la juventud y inexperiencia de su oponente. habrÁ tiempo de anotarse punto. al debate en colorado, vice presidencial en kentucky y 2 mÁs el 16 de octubre y 22 de octubre en florida. >>> por amplio margen, la gente cree que el presidente obama ganarÁ los debates. le resta presiÓn a mitt romney, que enfrenta el reto de borrar la ventaja del presidente en los estados cruciales. en washington, lourdes, univisiÓn. >>> este miÉrcoles, serÁ el primer debate presidencial, entre el presidente obama imitomenimity mimenmitt romney, lo pueden ver por univisiÓn, 9 del este/8 del cent centro/6 del pacÍfico y a 2 dÍas del debate presidencial entre b
. >>> a dramatic rescue in portland, maine, caught on cell phone camera. 84-year-old ursula nixon lost control of her car on friday, and some good samaritans braved the cold waters to pull her out. police say nixon sped through a stop sign, two fences and an oceanfront barrier before she ended up in the portland harbor. she's in fair condition. several of her rescuers were treated for hypothermia. >>> a 10-year-old boy in philadelphia is in big trouble. see that white van crashing into those cars right there. police say on sunday he stole it and he's the one behind the wheel. surveillance camera shows him getting out and trying to run away, but someone stops him. police say the boy saw the keys on the rear door and went on a bief joyride. he wasn't just slapped on the wrist either. he's expected to be charged with auto theft. >>> in hong kong, an investigation into a deadly ferry collision is under way. at least 36 people were killed. dozens injured. a boat filled with revelers slammed into the ferry. more than 100 people were rescued and sent to hospitals. one person is still missing. report
between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration, believed to cement president nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise, a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war, and this was sort of the definitive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980, and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election, despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with iran to delay freeing the hostages and deny the troubled carter campaign a huge preelection boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective
it's about power on a certain level. i mean, look, nixon, reagan, george w. bush, republican presidents have learned how to get stuff done at times in the face of congress and sometimes controlled by the other party. you know, this whole notion of the imperial presidency that arose under nixon, not coincidentally, a republican, i think you said it was kind of a tori sensibility. but it's really a concentration of power. >> are they stronger than the democrats and they know what that is? assembly, parliamentary? >> in some ways they have been more skillful and more ruthless in the way that they have moved the levers of power. in washington and outside of washington, to get stuff done. >> joy, i don't think the republicans have a karl rove a. malignant sense of power, i'm going to be the architect and i'm going to rule and they are spreading the money around and trying to get back the power. it does seem almost obsessive, the love of the white house. >> i think eugene robinson is right. for conservatives, the idea of being the cowboy, they like the self-image for themselves and
. that was 1960, where the jfk-richard nixon debates where richard nixon appeared sweaty and uncomfortable and then 2000 where al gore was seen as sighing and sort of dismissive of then texas governor george bush. so when you asked jen and barbara whether they were giving their candidates advice on things that are aesthetic, they should be. >> that's what we all remember, right, do you wear the gray suit on black and white tv, nixon. let me ask this, because you've done a lot of work on this. super pacs and the candidates are competing for money, which a lot of people might not realize. but the campaign can cover whatever it wants with the money, the super pac not linked to the campaign at all so not ideal for the campaign. the romney campaign, $86 million raised. the pro romney super pac, $41 million. and american ross kroeds, affiliate with karl rove, $58.7 million. so you can add that up and get a big number or say if karl rove doesn't like how mitt romney does tomorrow night, he could give a lot of that $60 million, the biggest chunk of change, to, i don't know, senate candidates, cong
the debates were first televised the first rule is appearances count. nixon should have shaved. al bush shouldn't have sighed. and the camera never blinks. challengers can benefit just by being on the stage with an incumbent president. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> reporter: it helps to have a well rehearsed one-liner. >> governor, there you go again. >> reporter: most memorably, lloyd bentsen's takedown of dan quayle in 1988. >> jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: but beware that deer in the head lights moment when a candidate forgets he's expected to be human. >> governor, if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard. >> i feel sorry for these candidates because there's a bunch of people sitting around a room right now telling them to do ten impossible things and then at the end saying be yourself. >> reporter: and if you lose the first round you can recover at the next match with a well executed zinger. >> i am not going to exploit fo
, richard nixon threw out the the first pitch, and the beatles threw played there, so what will happen to candlestick? >> see you in 30 minutes. >> i like that. >> the cbs evening news with scott pelley is coming up next. >> the latest news and
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
that first debate john kennedy on the stage with richard nixon and he was considered the winner of that on tv, not on radio, but that's where people were watching and then i think in 1976 in terms of a major gaffe when gerald ford who the president, hadn't been elected, richard nixon resigned, said that there was no domination by the soviet union of eastern europe. those are the two highlights, but that's a very rare occasion where a debate actually determines an election. >> let me ask you about this. both candidates seem to be praising each other lowering debate expectations. we're hearing mitt romney has been rehearsing zingers. the president has been rehearsing delivering shorter answers in this debate. what does each man need to do to convince the american public he's the right man for the job. let's start with president obama. >> president obama needs to just look presidential, not look flustered, not give any lines like hillary, you're likeable enough which seemed to demonstrate a certain arrogance or smugness or putting down anybody else. mitt romney has to be aggressive and has to ma
. which leads to lesson three -- appearances count, above all. jfk. tan. nixon? just out of the hospital, pale and refusing professional makeup. lighting counts, too. in 1984, reagan's people fussed more over his, man mondale's did over his. and reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get the rosy cheeks. lesson four. real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here, so, relax. learn your lines and don't speak in a look at your wristwatch because that will definitely hurt you. besides, 90 minutes and you're done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we're so glad you were watching. you may have noticed some differences here in our studio. let us hear from you at abcnews.com. and, of course, "nightline" will be along later. as we leave you tonight, with a look at the white house, aglow in pink in honor of breast cancer awareness month. we'll see you again tomorrow. until then, good night. >>> next at 6:00 disbelief in a albany school. the death of a teacher at the center of a student sex scandal. also. >> i am not now intimidated
count above all. jfk, tan. nixon, just out of the hospital, pale, refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get those rosy cheeks. lesson four, real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and takes it from the old gipper. it works. i think there's so much choreography that goes behind the debates. iasciwhat made-for-tv evehey first started with nixon and kennedy. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- getting ready for the duel in denver. >> we'll see how both candidates are preparing for the first presidential debate coming up tomorrow night. it is tuesday, october 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good to
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
to kennedy/nixon. >> i made a bet kennedy would win and i got $5 out of it. >> the rest of us got a tradition, an evolving tradition praised and criticized over the last 52 years. >> what about you? do you think debates are good now or bad? >> i don't know. we'll see wednesday. >> i guess we will. mr. kahn is a good reminder to all of us that often the americans who make democracy better are the americans who don't take democracy for granted. anita? >> exactly, gary. be sure to join us wednesday night beginning at 9:00 p.m. on our website. we're going to be streaming the debate and fact checking it live to see what the candidates say. also join us for the wrap-up of the debate at 11:00. of course, you can watch it here on wusa at 9:00. >>> tonight at 11:00, american university students being warned about a man fondling women near campus. in the last week this happened four times. all of the incidents happening in the 4200 block of massachusetts avenue between the berkshire apartments and the ward circle building. the description of the suspect we have is still really vague, between 20 and 30
for him. which lead to lesson three. appearances count above all. jfk, tan. nixon just out of the hospital, pale. refusing proquestional make -- refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wean just before going on to get rosie cheeks. lesson four, real debate sowing -- lesson four, real debating, so far after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and rosie. takes it from the old gipper. >> nice, glass of wine, relaxes you, gives you the blush. it works. i think there is so much choreography that goes behind the debates. it really is fascinating what a made-for-tv event they have become since 1960 when they first started nixon/kennedy. >> i imagine you would be a great debater. >> go ahead and say it. >> no. >> a joke you, know you want
for an awful lot of people. it made america the envy of the world and let richard nixon go to moscow and tell the soviet leader we have a classless society. >> suarez: that is also... the people living that dream are also numerically the largest part of the united states. how did they become so politically weak? >> well, they were very strong back then. as you know, ray, the environmental movement was strong, put pressure on washington. the labor movement was strong, put pressure on general motors and general electric and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you c
-aways as an issue, that goes back to kennedy and nixon. we've been talking about this part of reaction shots over 50 years. candidates still haven't mastered the thought you have to think about what you're looking like when you don't speak. bill clinton was one who actually used to practice his facial expressions for when he wasn't talking. i think most candidates would poo-poo that idea, but i think there is value in it. >> there is spin room for both sides, but the spin is going to be happening in the moment through social media, through twitter, through facebook. do you think that is a huge development because one false move can be global in a matter of seconds and trending on twitter? >> absolutely. you're on to something with that theory. i think twitter becomes the new spin room. the difference is that the spin room is spinning during the debate, not necessarily after. also, always before the spinning was handed down from the top down, and now you've got everybody in the country with the ability to weigh in and have an opinion as the debate is happening. i see a shift in a couple of ways. not
and debates have not been so decisive except when the races are very already tight, kennedy/nixon, gore/bush, but we may well see the narrative of a 1% romney which we've seen reinforcing the 47%. video and that -- and out of touch with not only his own being who he was, but with ordinary voters, average people in this country. >> i'm -- i'm eager to see how romney deals with follow-up questions. ryan's stuff the contention i don't have enough time, what i'm trying to basically tear apart the american social compact, you know, in some -- if you interpret it in one way but massively overhaul this nation's sort of tax plan, but i don't have time to get into the details, president obama's going to press him on this. >> well, right. well, one, you a situation where, you know, mitt romney apparently has all these memorized zingers that he's going to unleash on the president tomorrow, but then, what you don't hear folks talk about is, once the zinger has been thrown out there, then what? so he lays out and says energy independence, well when the follow-up question comes, what's the there ther
important. you go back in history. we all learned how nixon beat kennedy on the radio but on tv he lost. >> does it swing the way voters will vote in november what happens in these debates? >> here's another thing that's really important for romney. likability. he needs to get a human moment in there. there's a poll out where more people want to see obama on "dancing with the stars" than romney. that's sully. it's absolutely ridiculous but it talks about something obama has that romney has had a difficult time overcoming. >> it's something we heard with george w. bush and al gore at one time. thank you very much. he'll be watching the debates tomorrow in richmond with a group of voters. 9news and "u.s.a. today" are teaming up for debate night. beginning tomorrow night at 9:00, u.s.a. today reporters will be fact checking and counting blinks of what the candidates say. see it live on wusa9.com and catch aamer's reporting from virginia. you nova v.a. is a battleground state for this election. now to howard for the forecast. >>> thanks. scattered showers out there so grab the rain gear but
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)